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Fresh starts: Gardeners can preorder vegetable plants

Heather Desmarteau-Fast, right, teaches a beginning gardening class at Stamen and Pistil Urban Garden Center.
Heather Desmarteau-Fast, right, teaches a beginning gardening class at Stamen and Pistil Urban Garden Center.

By Melissa Wagoner

Silverton resident Heather Desmarteau-Fast is passionate about gardening.

“Gardening is my life. It’s part of my past and my present. It’s therapeutic,” Desmarteau-Fast said.

She’s bringing that passion to life for others with the advent of her new venture Stamen and Pistil Urban Garden Center.

“I’ve always had a desire to have my own place but I didn’t really know what that would look like,” Desmarteau-Fast said. “But I enjoy growing plants and I enjoy working with the public.”

With Stamen and Pistil, Desmarteau-Fast is trying something new by modeling her business after farms that offer a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program. These farms support themselves by offering shares of future harvests before they begin. Stamen and Pistil will be doing virtually the same thing by offering shares of this year’s vegetable starts before they have been seeded.

“Each business needs to have a niche and besides container gardening, I think this is my niche,” Desmarteau-Fast said.

Stamen and Pistil CSA
Small: Approximately four, four feet
by four feet beds. 45 plants

Medium: Ideal for a couple or a
young family of three. 80 plants

Large: Perfect for the family of
four to six. 200 plants

Stamen and Pistil is offering three garden programs based on available space and household size, from small scale and container gardening to a large plot ideal for a family of four to six.

“It’s taking the guesswork out of vegetable starts and the gamble out of shopping at a nursery,” Desmarteau-Fast said.

Stamen and Pistil is accepting applications until March 9 either online at www.stamenandpistil.net or at the Rooted in Food Fair being held at Seven Brides on March 7, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Although Stamen and Pistil is currently located in Salem, Desmarteau-Fast hopes to have a location in Silverton soon. In the meantime, she asks that those interested in visiting the nursery make an appointment by calling 503-871-4019.

“I’d like to keep the flame burning for people who already love gardening and to work on the next generation; if that means a little moss ball on the windowsill or a full-fledged garden that’s great. It’s just getting people to grow something,” Desmarteau-Fast said.

Heather Desmarteau-fast’s message is “Grow something!” even if it is in a snall container like this  succulent planter at Stamen and Pistil Urban Garden Center.
Heather Desmarteau-fast’s message is “Grow something!” even if it is in a snall container like this succulent planter at Stamen and Pistil Urban Garden Center.

 

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